Former Latin American presidents participated in the forum “What can we do for the people of Cuba?”

These voices from the international community, concerned about the Cuban reality, joined the initiative of legislators from the United States, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, who requested this Wednesday that "selective sanctions" be imposed against members of the Armed Forces, Police and anyone who "is complicit in the repression" of peaceful protests or human rights violations in Cuba.
( Infobae.com) The Interamerican Institute for Democracy organized the forum “What can we do for the people of Cuba?”, Where former leaders of the region spoke and the critical situation facing the island was analyzed. The former mayor of Miami, Tomás Regalado, gave welcomed the participants and recalled the dozens and dozens of young people who are currently imprisoned by the Cuban dictatorship for participating in the massive protests on July 11.

The first to speak was the former president of Argentina Eduardo Duhalde, who said he felt very sorry for the precarious situation that the Cuban people are experiencing.

“You have to be in solidarity with the Cuban people, if they need food or medicine, you have to see how to help them,” said the Argentine.

For his part, former Ecuadorian president Osvaldo Hurtado pointed out that Latin Americans are obliged to help Cubans who decided to rebel against the dictatorship.

“It strikes me that two democratic countries like Argentina and Mexico have not repudiated the protests in Cuba. We must draw attention to the conduct of these two countries, ”said Hurtado.

The Ecuadorian also described the latest protests in Cuba as rare, since in more than 60 years of revolution there have only been two massive demonstrations against the Castro regime, and among those is the one on July 11.

“Cubans have not been able to protest because it is prohibited, because there is a police regime with absolute power that prevents people from being able to express themselves freely,” Hurtado added.

His compatriot, the former ruler of Ecuador Lenín Moreno, stressed that the myth of the Cuban revolution made a strong impression on the Latin American imagination and that for this reason it is sometimes so difficult to fight the Castro dictatorship in the discursive field. However, he wondered: should we remain tolerant of those who preach intolerance?

Moreno said that it is encouraging to see the libertarian spirit of the new generation of Cubans that rose up against the regime. However, he pointed out that one must continue working and not fall into enthusiasm, and as an example he put the protests against the Maduro regime in Venezuela that later came to nothing.

Former Costa Rican president Miguel Ángel Rodríguez said that the Cuban dictatorship has been very adept at creating a secret police that can detect riots in time and frighten the population.

“It is necessary that the Castro-communist leaders feel rejection, I believe that political isolation is necessary, but that does not mean that we leave the Cuban people alone,” said the former Costa Rican president.

Rodríguez also said that Latin American public opinion must be mobilized to demolish the myth of the Cuban revolution and pointed out that the countries of the region must demonstrate by example that democracy is a better system than dictatorship.

Finally, the Costa Rican said that an armed intervention would not solve the Cuban problem but would make it worse.

In conclusion, Carlos Sánchez Berzaín assured that the protests of July 11 liquidated the myth of the Cuban revolution. “The Cuban youth is the one who is demanding that the dictatorship leave.”

Moderator Guillermo Lousteau thanked the participants and recalled the importance of recent events in Cuba.

These voices from the international community, concerned about the Cuban reality, joined the initiative of legislators from the United States, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, who requested this Wednesday that “selective sanctions” be imposed against members of the Armed Forces, Police and anyone who “is complicit in the repression” of peaceful protests or human rights violations in Cuba.

In a joint statement, the political leaders of these nations spoke about the protests of July 11, which occurred with the Caribbean country plunged into a serious economic and health crisis, with the pandemic at its worst and a severe shortage of food, medicine and other basic products.

“We strongly condemn the Cuban authorities for using violence, intimidation and censorship to deny Cubans their constitutional right to assemble and protest peacefully,” said the statement signed, among others, by Cuban-born Senator Bob Menéndez, who He chairs the Foreign Relations Committee of the United States Senate.

The document was also endorsed by legislators Marko Mihkelso, from Estonia; Rihards Kols from Latvia; Žygiamantas Pavilionis, from Lithuania; Pavel Fischer, from the Czech Republic; and Tom Tugendhat from the UK.

The legislators expressed their “firm and absolute support” for the Cuban people and their demands, as well as their aspirations to “forge a new democratic future with an emphasis on human dignity and social justice.”

In addition, they condemned “the violence, intimidation and censorship” of the authorities “to deny Cubans their constitutional right to assemble and protest peacefully”, as well as the call made by the president of the island, Miguel Díaz-Canel, to his supporters to take to the streets in response to the protests.

Ten days after the day of protests, the number of people arrested, which also include artists, activists and journalists, is estimated at several hundred, according to different counts by human rights organizations.